Posted by on 20. Dezember 2020

AWS offers companies several opportunities to use their services based on their business requirements and to get discounts on quantities. Traditional on-demand instances allow you to pay for capacity on time without long-term obligations or prepayment. AWS savings plans are a way to save money by committing to using them on a micro-scale: you commit to a certain amount of spending per hour and, in exchange, you get a discount on the VM you already make. Less flexible reserved instances are another option for fixed or predictable use applications and can offer up to 75% off on-demand prices. Especially for small businesses, there are a number of ways to get AWS credits to reduce the load. And of course, they encourage groups of scale, spot instances and other optimization efforts to reduce expenses and waste, but these are more opportunities for cost control than discounts. In addition, you can always expect better prices. AWS offers businesses several opportunities to use services based on your business needs. Traditional on-demand instances allow you to pay for capacity on time without long-term obligations or prepayment.

This model offers the greatest flexibility and is ideal for new initiatives that do not require basic resources. Reserved instances are ideal for fixed-use or predictable applications and can offer up to 75% off on-demand prices. Back to my time at IBM, we have generally referred to discount contracts as enterprise licensing agreements (ELA). An ELA is a software site license that is sold to large companies. It generally allows unlimited use of individual or multiple software products throughout the organization, although there are often some restrictions and restrictions. When I was at IBM, they were sold in advance for a dollar and a lifespan, usually 3 to 5 years, and generally had a usage cap, so that at some point overruns could occur – which, of course, would help renegotiate. When AWS came on the market in 2006, it changed virtually everything to the way companies used infrastructure, including the sourcing aspect. After buying infrastructure from their former IT providers for decades, companies were used to complex and iterative intensive contract negotiations. AWS has tried to change that by bringing transparency and simplicity into the buying process with clear and easy-to-understand prices.